1. Are “Advisory” Measures” Permitted on the California Ballot?
UC Davis law professor Vikram David Amar discusses a recent decision by the California Supreme Court temporarily blocking an “advisory” measure from appearing on the ballot.

    Are “Advisory” Measures” Permitted on the California Ballot?

    UC Davis law professor Vikram David Amar discusses a recent decision by the California Supreme Court temporarily blocking an “advisory” measure from appearing on the ballot.

    22 hours ago  /  0 notes

  2. Understanding Why Cash Payments to College Athletes Is a Bad Idea
George Washington University law professor and economist Neil Buchanan explains why cash payments to college athletes does not solve the problems plaguing college athletics.

    Understanding Why Cash Payments to College Athletes Is a Bad Idea

    George Washington University law professor and economist Neil Buchanan explains why cash payments to college athletes does not solve the problems plaguing college athletics.

    1 day ago  /  0 notes

  3. Video-Recording Police–Citizen Encounters Is Necessary but Not EnoughIn light of recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, Cornell University law professor Michael Dorf weighs the benefits and costs of equipping police officers with wearable cameras to record encounters with citizens.

    Video-Recording Police–Citizen Encounters Is Necessary but Not Enough

    In light of recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, Cornell University law professor Michael Dorf weighs the benefits and costs of equipping police officers with wearable cameras to record encounters with citizens.

    2 days ago  /  1 note

  4. The Reclamation of TortureGuest columnist and professor of law and government at Cornell University, Joseph Margulies discusses the use of the term “torture” in American media and the public sphere. Margulies describes the change in language after 9/11 and explains the significance of the word’s return to the public’s vocabulary.

    The Reclamation of Torture

    Guest columnist and professor of law and government at Cornell University, Joseph Margulies discusses the use of the term “torture” in American media and the public sphere. Margulies describes the change in language after 9/11 and explains the significance of the word’s return to the public’s vocabulary.

    4 days ago  /  1 note

  5. Who Is Abusing Power: Rick Perry or Michael McCrum, His Special Prosecutor?John Dean, former counsel to the president, comments on the recent indictment of Texas Governor Rick Perry. Dean cautions against falling for Perry’s and even some Democrats’ quick dismissal of the indictment as politically motivated and lacking sufficient basis. Dean argues that only Perry, not his special prosecutor, may have abused his power.

    Who Is Abusing Power: Rick Perry or Michael McCrum, His Special Prosecutor?

    John Dean, former counsel to the president, comments on the recent indictment of Texas Governor Rick Perry. Dean cautions against falling for Perry’s and even some Democrats’ quick dismissal of the indictment as politically motivated and lacking sufficient basis. Dean argues that only Perry, not his special prosecutor, may have abused his power.

    1 week ago  /  0 notes

  6. Who Will Protect New York’s Kids from Preventable Death and Permanent Disability? Cardozo law professor Marci Hamilton discusses an archaic Orthodox Jewish practice that persists despite putting infants at risk of death or permanent injury.

    Who Will Protect New York’s Kids from Preventable Death and Permanent Disability?

    Cardozo law professor Marci Hamilton discusses an archaic Orthodox Jewish practice that persists despite putting infants at risk of death or permanent injury.

    1 week ago  /  0 notes

  7. Determining Parentage in the New FamilyHofstra University law professor Joanna Grossman comments on a recent decision by the Supreme Court of New Hampshire recognizing that both women who raised a child (while they were in a relationship together) are legal parents, despite that only one is the biological mother.

    Determining Parentage in the New Family

    Hofstra University law professor Joanna Grossman comments on a recent decision by the Supreme Court of New Hampshire recognizing that both women who raised a child (while they were in a relationship together) are legal parents, despite that only one is the biological mother.

    1 week ago  /  0 notes

  8. The Fifth Circuit Blocks Mississippi Law From Closing the Last Abortion ClinicCornell University law professor Sherry Colb discusses a recent decision by a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit sustaining an as-applied constitutional challenge to a Mississippi law requiring “admitting privileges” for physicians who provide abortions.

    The Fifth Circuit Blocks Mississippi Law From Closing the Last Abortion Clinic

    Cornell University law professor Sherry Colb discusses a recent decision by a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit sustaining an as-applied constitutional challenge to a Mississippi law requiring “admitting privileges” for physicians who provide abortions.

    1 week ago  /  0 notes

  9. Suing the PresidentChapman University law professor Ronald Rotunda discusses on the lawsuit against President Obama and explains the issue of judicial standing to sue the President for exceeding his constitutional authority.

    Suing the President

    Chapman University law professor Ronald Rotunda discusses on the lawsuit against President Obama and explains the issue of judicial standing to sue the President for exceeding his constitutional authority.

    1 week ago  /  0 notes

  10. Is the University of California Wrong For Admitting More Non-Californians?
UC Davis law professor Vikram David Amar discusses the claim that the University of California is admitting out-of-state and international students to the exclusion of California students.

    Is the University of California Wrong For Admitting More Non-Californians?

    UC Davis law professor Vikram David Amar discusses the claim that the University of California is admitting out-of-state and international students to the exclusion of California students.

    2 weeks ago  /  0 notes

  11. College Sports Should Be Treated as a Source of Funding for Nonprofit Universities, Not as a For-Profit Business George Washington University law professor and economist Neil Buchanan explains why college sports should be treated as a source of funding for their nonprofit universities rather than as for-profit businesses.

    College Sports Should Be Treated as a Source of Funding for Nonprofit Universities, Not as a For-Profit Business

    George Washington University law professor and economist Neil Buchanan explains why college sports should be treated as a source of funding for their nonprofit universities rather than as for-profit businesses.

    2 weeks ago  /  0 notes

  12. Academic Freedom in the Salaita Case. Cornell University law professor Michael Dorf discusses a recent decision by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to revoke an offer to Steven G. Salaita of a tenured faculty appointment after Salaita tweeted strong criticism of Israel’s conduct in Gaza.

    Academic Freedom in the Salaita Case. Cornell University law professor Michael Dorf discusses a recent decision by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to revoke an offer to Steven G. Salaita of a tenured faculty appointment after Salaita tweeted strong criticism of Israel’s conduct in Gaza.

    2 weeks ago  /  0 notes

  13. Thoughts On Nixon’s Resignation
For the fortieth anniversary of former President Richard Nixon’s resignation, John Dean, a Justia columnist and former counsel to the president, offers some thoughts and a preview of his newly released book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It. As Dean explains in this adapted preface to the book, the narrative is based on actual White House recordings of Watergate-related activities, which Dean himself listened to and transcribed.

    Thoughts On Nixon’s Resignation

    For the fortieth anniversary of former President Richard Nixon’s resignation, John Dean, a Justia columnist and former counsel to the president, offers some thoughts and a preview of his newly released book, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It. As Dean explains in this adapted preface to the book, the narrative is based on actual White House recordings of Watergate-related activities, which Dean himself listened to and transcribed.

    2 weeks ago  /  0 notes

  14. The RFRA, Abortion, the Catholic Bishops, and the Satanic TempleCardozo Law professor Marci Hamilton comments on a recent move by the Satanic Temple seeking exemption from coercive informed consent laws citing the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc.  Hamilton describes how clear it is now that RFRA cuts both ways.

    The RFRA, Abortion, the Catholic Bishops, and the Satanic Temple

    Cardozo Law professor Marci Hamilton comments on a recent move by the Satanic Temple seeking exemption from coercive informed consent laws citing the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc.  Hamilton describes how clear it is now that RFRA cuts both ways.

    3 weeks ago  /  7 notes

  15. The Supreme Court’s Approach to Restitution For Victims of Child Pornography PossessionCornell University law professor Sherry Colb discusses the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Paroline v. United States, in which the Court considered how much restitution a victim of sexual abuse should be able to recover from a single perpetrator.

    The Supreme Court’s Approach to Restitution For Victims of Child Pornography Possession

    Cornell University law professor Sherry Colb discusses the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Paroline v. United States, in which the Court considered how much restitution a victim of sexual abuse should be able to recover from a single perpetrator.

    3 weeks ago  /  0 notes